Unhealthy partnerships: Karnataka Public Private Partnership, India By Dr. Sylvia Karpagam

Free and Public

The Rajiv Gandhi super-speciality hospital, in Raichur, Karnataka, has been celebrated as an example of a successful public-private partnership (PPP). The Planning Commission of India described it as a ‘possible model for replication and up-scaling’, while the National Institute for Transforming India (NITI) Aayog has been active in promoting PPPs across the health sector in India, with the World Bank as the technical partner. The Confederation of Indian Industries (CII), which has submitted a report to the NITI Aayog on options for PPP for select Non Communicable Diseases, hails this as a successful model. The fact that this PPP has been a complete failure and has led to the termination of the contract as early as 2012, figures nowhere in any of these discussions. This calls into question the agenda behind the promotion of hospital PPP models.

The Rajiv Gandhi Super-speciality hospital was set up in 1997 to provide tertiary care with Rs 600 million (US$150,000) in financial aid from the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Companies as a one-time grant and as a PPP between the state government and Apollo Hospitals Enterprise Limited . The government was to pay a monthly Rs. 10 million on top of providing the 73 acre campus land, hospital building, staff quarters, roads, power, water and infrastructure. A one-off government grant covered building and civil works, medical equipments, furniture and fitting, non medical equipment, computers and software, vehicles, pre-operative expenses and working capital. Moreover the government agreed to pay Rs. 95 million for re-equipping the hospital and Rs. 101 million for administrative expenditure.

One of the key objectives of establishing this PPP was to provide quality healthcare to patients below the poverty line (BPL) in the districts of the Gulbarga division where the BPL population has been identified to constitute the majority (67%) of the population. However, data on the utilisation of the hospital services reveals that of the 340 hospital beds, only 154 were operational, of which only 40 (25.9% of operational beds and 11.4% of total beds), were available to BPL patients.

Figure 1 and 2 of the utilization of In-patient and Out-patients services show failure to achieve the hospital’s primary objective of providing services to BPL patients.

Figure 1: Rajiv Gandhi Super-speciality hospital: Utilization of In-patient services by BPL and Above Poverty Line (APL) 2002–2003 to 2010–2011 (Feb 2011)

 

India PPP- Apollo Hospital-Fig1

(Source: Government of Karnataka, 2011)

 Figure 2: Rajiv Gandhi Super-speciality hospital: Utilization of Out-patient services by BPL and APL 2002-2003 to 2010 -2011 (Feb 2011) 

India PPP- Apollo Hospital-Fig1

(Source: Government of Karnataka, 2011)

The evaluation report of the government of Karnataka states that “this sub-optimal capacity utilisation has seriously affected the sustainability of the hospital, thereby leading to serious question on the commitment towards the PPP model of functioning”. The report has also found this model to have poor governance and accountability, with poor maintenance of records and failure to deliver on many fronts.

On May 31, 2012, the state government terminated the contract with Apollo and the hospital went into a ‘coma’. In August 2016, hospital equipment was seized by the Principal District and Sessions court for defaulting on payments. According to S.K. Purohit, the lawyer for the company that supplied laboratory items to the hospital “The material seized is nothing as compared to the outstanding. This is just a warning to the hospital authorities. We will hand over the seized material to Court which will auction them. If the Hospital does not pay the remaining amount, the court may again order for further action for recovering the remaining dues. ”

The government has handed the hospital from the Ministry of Health to the Ministry of Higher Education to set it up as a teaching hospital. This was widely protested for fear of adversely affecting poor communities and employees.

It is unacceptable that a failed hospital is being promoted as a successful example of a PPP. Why is this model being called successful in spite of no documented evidence of the success? As Dr. Sujatha Rao, Former Union Secretary, Ministry of health says ‘The NITI Aayog has an obligation and a duty to consult, listen, collect evidence, analyse, understand and reflect, not prescribe based on the advice of the World Bank and a few interested corporate houses.’

The writer is a public health doctor and researcher who has studied the PPP models in Karnataka and works with urban marginalised communities.

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